Cold Game Music Video

                                                          About “Cold Game” the Music Video

The Cold Game music video is a commentary on sad and ever-present, recurring current
events, involving the perpetual plight of underprivileged people in the United States. In this
video, Unity Lewis plays the role of an individual tormented by visions of police brutality; visions
that are repercussions of living in a tense climate between the police and the community. In his
vision, he is pushed by paranoia to the edges of insanity. This video presents the unsettling
facts, pain and frustration of being trapped in the ghetto while living in a police state. It
demonstrates how constant exposure to an environment of violence can cause maddening and
deadly psychological damage. This song also chronicles what seems to be a never ending
conflict in America between law enforcement and the people in which they are sworn to protect.
Cold Game beckons the viewer to look within and center themselves before reacting in a way
that feeds into the traps set forth by a toxic system. It suggests to both, civilian and officer that
instead of fueling the destructive cycle of violence, we should find our humanity and consider other
ways of seeking out justice and peace.

 

Cold Game Music Video Credits:
Unity Lewis ft. Rappin’ 4-Tay
“Cold Game”
TRT: 4:04 (CC) Original Version
Label: Unity Lewis Arts and Entertainment
Director: Unity Lewis and Benjamin Rivers
Director of Photography: Benjamin Rivers
Producer: Unity Lewis and Benjamin Rivers
Production: Unity Lewis Arts and Entertainment
Editor: Unity Lewis
Stereo: NTSC

Cold Game Song Credits:
Cold Game (Song Credits)
Music Produced By Unity Lewis
feat. Rappin’ 4-Tay
Written by Unity Lewis and Rappin’ 4-Tay
(Guitar By The Genie, Bass By Weldon Hall, Flute by Michael Bass,
Vibraphone by Abnmusic3)
Mixed and Mastered By Matt Kelley

Young Precise Publishing ASCAP

Copyright 2017 Unity Lewis Arts & Ent All Rights Reserved

About Cold Game

The Cold Game audio single features all street, clean, instrumental and accapella edits of the
track, for both the music video and album versions (8 tracks total). The project is a commentary
on sad and ever-present, recurring current events, involving the perpetual plight of
underprivileged people in the United States. Unity Lewis and Rappin’ 4-Tay join forces to
present to you the unsettling facts, pain and frustration of being trapped in the ghetto while living
in a police state. This song also chronicles what seems to be a never ending conflict in America
between law enforcement and the people in which they are sworn to protect. Cold Game
beckons the listener to look within and center themselves before reacting in a way that feeds
into the traps set forth by a toxic system. It suggests to both, civilian and officer that instead of
fueling the destructive cycle of violence, we should find our humanity and consider other ways
of seeking out justice and peace.

Stream, download and purchase the Cold Game Maxi-Single now: Spotify, AppleMusic, Amazon, Tidal, Google Play and anywhere music is sold online.

 

 

Black Women Artists on Art: The Legacy Exhibit: Oakstop 3/6/15 Through 3/28/15 (Photo Gallery)

Black Artists on Art: The Legacy Exhibit- Opening Reception 2/6/15 (Photo Gallery)

Black Artists on Art: The Legacy Exhibit- Oakstop 1/23/15 through 3/5/15 (Photo Gallery)

Black Artists on Art: The Origins Exhibit

15780821_1831856510435650_8612580297153797628_n                                                                           PRESS RELEASE

From the collection of Dr. Samella Lewis featuring works by Elizabeth Catlett, Jacob Lawrence, Charles White, Dr. Samella Lewis and more

Opening Reception: Friday, January 6th 6-9pm
Curated by: Unity Lewis

Joyce Gordon Gallery presents, “Black Artists on Art: The Origins,” featuring iconic African American fine artists, such as Elizabeth Catlett, Jacob Lawrence, Charles White, and Dr. Samella Lewis – America’s leading historian of black fine art.

BAOA is based on the Black Artists on Art book series first created by Dr. Samella Lewis and Ruth G. Waddy in 1969, which catalogued over 150 actively-producing black fine artists who were often overlooked by mainstream museums, galleries, and fine art institutions. The revolutionary book series was an instant success, and sold thousands of copies in its first three years before going out of print.

“I wanted to make a chronology of African American artists, and artists of African descent, to document our history. The historians weren’t doing it. I felt it better the artists do it anyway, through pictorial and written information… It was really about the movement.” – Dr. Samella Lewis.

In 2015, Dr. Lewis’s grandson, Unity Lewis, and co-organizer, Trevor Parham, continued her legacy by reviving the book series and organizing the traveling exhibition of the same name, which had its debut at Oakstop Gallery in February 2015. The legacy exhibition united artists from the original Black Artists on Art books with contemporary artists, resulting in an intergenerational display of black fine art. It also served as a campaign launch to recruit over 500 new black artists for upcoming volumes of Black Artists on Art. The exhibit traveled around the bay area, showcasing at the Marin Community Foundation and the Petaluma Arts Center.

This iteration of the BAOA exhibit at the Joyce Gordon Gallery focuses on the art and lives of the legendary artists featured in the original two volumes of the book. These artists brought notoriety to, and gained notoriety out of this series and made BAOA the classic and essential publication that it is considered today.

In addition to Dr Samella Lewis’ collection, several limited edition prints of her creation will be available. This is an exclusive opportunity to invest in this rare classic work. A portion of the proceeds from these prints specifically will go towards the completion and publishing of future volumes of Black Artists on Art.

Joyce Gordon Gallery is a commercial fine art gallery located in the downtown district of Oakland, California. It exhibits art that reflects the social and cultural diversity of the Bay Area and international artists. The aim of the gallery is to respect the creative pursuits of the individual and seeks to make such work accessible to a broad audience.

Black Artists on Art: The Book Series

IMG_4383                                                                        BLACK ARTISTS ON ART…

is a book series started by Samella Lewis and Ruth G. Waddy in 1969. The original two volumes featured the works and words of over 150 actively producing artists of the late 1960’s and early 1970’s.

Now, over 40 years later, BLACK ARTISTS ON ART is releasing new volumes of the book that highlight black artists who have redefined what it means to be a black artist while still preserving the traditions of African cultural expression.

BLACK ARTISTS ON ART is currently accepting artist submissions for Volumes 3 & 4 of the book.

                               Black Artists on Art Books

                                                          Black Artists on Art: Then and Now    

When the first of two volumes titled Black Artists on Art appeared in 1969 it was the height of the Black Arts Movement in America. Artists Samella Lewis and Ruth Waddy edited those two volumes and it cannot be emphasized enough how dynamic it was for two Black women to take on the task of historicizing contemporary Black art at that time. Waddy had already made her mark in documenting the contributions of Black artists by being one of the authors of Prints by American Negro Artists in 1967. The rst issue of the journal Black Art an International Quarterly wouldn’t appear until 1976 which is a good indication of how far ahead of the curve Waddy and Lewis were when they compiled Black Artists on Art. Black Artists on Art with its focus on contemporary Black art as a publication was the tipping point that made journals such as The International Review of African American Art and Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art a viable notion from that point forward. It was primarily Lewis and Waddy’s books that documented the visual expression of the Black Arts Movement – most signi cantly the output of Black west coast visual artists such as David Hammons, John Outterbridge, Betty Saar and Noah Purifoy.

To its credit Black Artists on Art placed the visual aesthetic of the Black Arts Movement era in a signi cant historical context from its own subjective contemporaneous view – as opposed to a retrospective historicity or a history from those outside of the Black aesthetic movements of that time. The in uence of Black Artists on Art was felt some four decades after its publication when curator Kellie Jones’ landmark exhibit “Now Dig This: Art & Black Los Angeles 1960-1980” appeared in 2012. Not only were copies of the two volumes exhibited in the show but David Hammons’ body print art piece titled “America the Beautiful” – rst seen represented in Black Artists on Art – became the emblematic image for Jones’ brilliant retrospective by occupying banners all across Los Angeles during the exhibit. The book Black Artists on Art signi cantly documents several of Oakland’s Black artists such as Casper Banjo, David Bradford, Marie Calloway, Margo Humphrey, Arthur Monroe, Raymond Howell, Ben Hazard and Phillip Mason – who’s painting “Woman as Body Spirit” graces the cover of volume one’s revised edition. It seems profoundly appropriate to envision a 21st century manifestation of Black Artists on Art here in Oakland California.

– Duane Deterville

 

Unity and Samella LewisUnity Lewis and Dr. Samella Lewis

 

                                                                   THE LEGACY CONTINUES

I wanted to make a chronology of African American artists, and artists of African descent, to document our history. The historians weren’t doing it. I felt it better the artists do it anyway, through pictorial and written information. I thought it was absolutely necessary, not just for the public but for artists, to know what was going on. In my opinion, the artists were the people who documented our history better than anybody else. A lot was going on culturally. Blacks were rebelling and revolting and doing things that they hadn’t done before. I felt we had to do something. I created these books to inform artists, and inspire them to be participants in the movement. It was really about the movement.

-Dr. Samella S. Lewis

More than forty years after the release of the second volume of Black Artist on Art, I have come to preserve and continue the legacy. A legacy that represents more than just the work of my grandmother Dr. Samella Lewis; but the legacy of the Black Arts Movement (BAM), it’s growth and development, over the decades. Like so many of my fellow artists, I am proof that BAM has been moving like the underground railroad. The fact that Black people continue to face the same issues in today’s society that our predecessors faced in the sixties, indicates to me, that we must relentlessly press on. The struggle continues, as black people in the Diaspora address the same beast of discrimination that continues to threaten our lives, and the wellbeing of our children.

We are still a marginalized people whose historical contribution is not properly taught in schools. Our accomplishments are undermined, while our creative genius is routinely plagiarized. Our blood flows daily in the streets of this still segregated nation, at the hands of a system that has no regard for us. A system that has no intention of seeing us living out our full potential. It is now, as it has always been, up to us to protect and preserve our legacy, culture and story. We take on this responsibility so that future generations will understand, with accuracy, the heritage that so many of our heroes have sacrificed their lives to bequeath to us.

– Unity Lewis

                        Black Artists On Art_Brochure_REVISED (dragged) 2

The Black Artists on Art Legacy Exhibit at Oakstop Gallery served as the kickoff for a campaign to produce new volumes in the Black Artists on Art book series and recruit over 500 black artists across the United States to demonstrate their creativity in this ongoing legacy. Furthermore, this exhibit is intended to form a community of support around the Black Artists on Art brand to extend it beyond books.

                             To accomplish this, we will need YOU to support Black Artists on Art.

Black Artists On Art_Brochure_REVISED (dragged) 3 copyBlack Artists On Art_Brochure_REVISED (dragged)

                                E-mail all submissions to: blackartistsonart@gmail.com

 

7th Dynasty Track Listing and Credits

 

1.Funk The Fake
feat. George Clinton- 04:00:34- QM9ZU1600027

2.Good News, Bad News
feat. Tracey Lewis Clinton and Amuka- 03:49:38- QM9ZU1600028

3.P.T.S. (People Take Shit)-
04:11:63- QM9ZU1600029

4.Wedding Bells
feat. Tra’zae Lewis-Clinton, Tracey Lewis-Clinton and George Clinton (Violins By Tarika Lewis)- 03:47:02- QM9ZU1600030

5.Free The Funk
feat. Amuka, Sly Stone, Bebe and George Clinton (Additional Keys By Sly Stone)- 04:19:09- QM9ZU1600031

6.UnI
(Horns By Josef Leimberg, Kamasi Washington and Tom Rawls)- 03:15:23- QM9ZU1600032

7.My Light (Violins By Tarika Lewis)-
03:10:08- QM9ZU1600033

8.Wahala
feat. Tracey Lewis-Clinton and George Clinton- 4:13:30- QM9ZU1600034

9.Bring It Back
feat. Holly Saucy- 04:02:61- QM9ZU1600035

10.Glad We Made It
feat. Rappin’ 4-Tay, George Clinton, Tracey Lewis Clinton and Amuka (Horns By Josef Leimberg, Kamasi Washington and Tom Rawls)- 04:19:18- QM9ZU1600036

11.Funk The Fake-Ras G Remix
feat. George Clinton- 03:20:28- QM9ZU1600037

12.Free The Funk Trackademicks Remix
feat. Amuka, Sly Stone, Bebe and George Clinton (Additional Keys By Sly Stone)- 04:05:54-  QM9ZU1600038

Executive Produced By Unity Lewis

Produced By Egon Brainparts
Track 11 Produced By Ras G/ Track 12 Produced By Trackademicks(Bonus Tracks)

Tracks 1-10 Mixed By Egon Brainparts/ Track 11 Mixed Live By Ras G With Additional Mixing By Matt Kelley/ Track 12 Mixed By Matt Kelley

Mastered By Bob Lanzner/

A&R Support By Stephen Hodge, Bruce Robinson, Sonny Cool,
Tracey Lewis-Clinton, Carlon Thompson-Clinton, Overton Loyd and Matt at Funkprobosci

Young Precise Publishing ASCAP, Copyright 2016 Unity Lewis Arts & Ent All Rights Reserved
unauthorized copying, reproduction, hiring, lending, public performance and broadcasting prohibited

 

Free The Funk Track Listing and Credits

 

1.Free The Funk produced by Egon Brainparts Street
feat. Amuka, Sly Stone, Bebe and George Clinton (Additional Keys By Sly Stone)- 04:20:13- QM9ZU1600001

2.Free The Funk produced by Egon Brainparts Clean
feat. Amuka, Sly Stone, Bebe and George Clinton (Additional Keys By Sly Stone)- 04:20:15- QM9ZU1600002

3.Free The Funk produced by Egon Brainparts Instrumental
feat. Amuka, Sly Stone, Bebe and George Clinton (Additional Keys By Sly Stone)- 04:19:49- QM9ZU1600003

4.Free The Funk produced by Egon Brainparts Acapella
feat. Amuka, Sly Stone, Bebe and George Clinton (Additional Keys By Sly Stone)-  04:05:09- QM9ZU1600004

5.Free The Funk Korese “Big Tunes” J of TownFuturist Music Video Remix
feat. Amuka, Sly Stone, Bebe and George Clinton (Guitar By Yohimbe J. Sampson and Additional Keys By Sly Stone)- 04:03:60- QM9ZU1600005

6.Free The Funk Korese “Big Tunes” J of TownFuturist Music Video Remix Clean
feat. Amuka, Sly Stone, Bebe and George Clinton (Guitar By Yohimbe J. Sampson and Additional Keys By Sly Stone)- 04:03:63- QM9ZU1600006

7.Free The Funk Korese “Big Tunes” J of TownFuturist Music Video Remix Instrumental
feat. Amuka, Sly Stone, Bebe and George Clinton (Guitar By Yohimbe J. Sampson and Additional Keys By Sly Stone)- 04:03:51- QM9ZU1600007

8.Free The Funk Korese “Big Tunes” J of TownFuturist Music Video Remix Acapella
feat. Amuka, Sly Stone, Bebe and George Clinton (Additional Keys By Sly Stone)- 03:58:01- QM9ZU1600008

9.Free The Funk Trackademicks Remix
feat. Amuka, Sly Stone, Bebe and George Clinton (Additional Keys By Sly Stone)- 04:06:45- QM9ZU1600009

10.Free The Funk Trackademicks Remix Clean
feat. Amuka, Sly Stone, Bebe and George Clinton (Additional Keys By Sly Stone)- 04:06:17- QM9ZU1600010

11.Free The Funk Trackademicks Remix Instrumental
feat. Amuka, Sly Stone, Bebe and George Clinton (Additional Keys By Sly Stone)- 04:06:50- QM9ZU1600011

12.Free The Funk Trackademicks Remix Acapella
feat. Amuka, Sly Stone, Bebe and George Clinton (Additional Keys By Sly Stone)- 03:49:68- QM9ZU1600012

Executive Produced By Unity Lewis
Tracks 1-4 Produced By Egon Brainparts/ Tracks 5-8 Produced By Big Tunes of TownTroniks/ Tracks 9-12 Produced By Trackademicks
Tracks 1-4 Mixed By Egon Brainparts/ Tracks 5-12 Mixed By Matt Kelley/
Mastered By Bob Lanzner/

A&R Support By Stephen Hodge, Bruce Robinson, Sonny Cool, Tracey Lewis-Clinton, Carlon Thompson-Clinton, Overton Loyd and Matt at Funkprobosci

Young Precise Publishing ASCAP, Copyright 2016 Unity Lewis Arts & Ent All Rights Reserved
unauthorized copying, reproduction, hiring, lending, public performance and broadcasting prohibited